Department of Computer Science

Hridesh Rajan

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Got a question or comment? Contact me at (515) 294-6168 or hridesh@iastate.edu.

Official Biographical Sketch

Hridesh Rajan is a full professor of computer science at Iowa State University, where he has been since 2005. Professor Rajan earned his MS and Ph.D. from the University of Virginia in 2004 and 2005 respectively. Prof. Rajan's research interests are in programming languages, software engineering, and data science where he is most known for his design of the Ptolemy programming language that showed how to modularly reason about crosscutting concerns and the Boa programming language and its infrastructure that decreases the barriers to data-driven software engineering. Professor Rajan’s recent research and educational activities are aimed at decreasing the barrier to entry to data-driven sciences to broaden participation. His work on the Boa project is aimed at invention and refinement of cyberinfrastructures that democratize data-driven science. His work on the Midwest Big Data Summer School is experimenting with broadly accessible data science curricula. Professor Rajan was the founding general chair of the Midwest Big Data Summer School.

Professor Rajan is the director of the Laboratory for Software Design at Iowa State University, director of graduate admissions and recruitment for the computer science department, Professor-In-Charge for the Data Science programs at Iowa State University, and chair of the information technology committee for the university. Professor Rajan serves on the steering committee of the Midwest Big Data Hub, a consortium of universities in the Midwest region of the United States focussed on promoting data science activities. Professor Rajan also serves as an associate editor for the IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering. Professor Rajan is a recipient of the National Science Foundation CAREER award in 2009, LAS Award for Early Achievement in Research in 2010, and a Big-12 Fellowship in 2012. He is a distinguished member of ACM, and a member of IEEE, and AAAS. He is also the inaugural holder of the Kingland professorship in the Department of Computer Science.

Short bio (for talks, etc.) Hridesh Rajan is the Kingland professor in the Department of Computer Science at Iowa State University. Prof. Rajan's research interests are in programming languages, software engineering, and data science where he is most known for his design of the Ptolemy programming language that showed how to modularly reason about crosscutting concerns and the Boa programming language and its infrastructure that decreases the barriers to data-driven software engineering. He has been recognized by the US National Science Foundation (NSF) with a CAREER award, an Early Achievement in Research Award, a Big-12 Fellowship, the Kingland Professorship, and an exemplary mentor for Junior Faculty award. Prof. Rajan is a distinguished member of the ACM, and serves as an associate editor for the IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering.

Academic Background

My advisor at University of Virginia was Kevin Sullivan, whose advisor was David Notkin. My academic genealogy goes all the way to Edsger Dijkstra.

In prior life, I worked at Bell Labs India, the R&D organization of Lucent Technologies. At the time, I was interested in bandwidth and power optimization issues in mobile ad hoc & sensor networks as they scale up. I still keep up with these topics.

My Canine Children: Sheru & Sarisha

Canine Children Canine Children

Personal Restoration Project (2005-2017): 1902 Victorian in Ames

1902 Victorian

1902 Victorian

Fall At Night

Fall at Night

Personal

I come from a small town called Mokama in Bihar, India. I have had the pleasure to live within 50ft from the river Ganga, a major river in India, for most of my childhood. If you are from Mokama, I will be glad to hear from you. Send me an e-mail and we can share stories :-).

Beside computer science, I love cavaliers (trying to grow into cyclones), Dreamworks Animation Movies, driving, racquet ball, paintball, chess, and pool (not necessarily in this order). Sometimes, I also pretend to be a handyman.